Tips & Tricks To Escape Writer's Block

Ashley Marie

Headmaster
Staff member
We all suffer from writer's block, and we want to create a platform to share ideas on how to overcome it. We've included a few of our favorite tips & tricks to escape writer's block, and we'd love to hear yours, too!

Get creative
This can happen in a number of ways, and it sort of encompasses every trick we list below, but it's the most important! Find creativity in any way, shape, form, or fashion you can - and run with it. Dance it out, read, free write, go on a jog, spend an afternoon taking pictures, visit a new place or invite an old friend for coffee and a trip to the museum.

Free write
Try to free 15-20 minutes a few times a day to grab a journal and just write. Sometimes, you'll come up with something that seems like a diary entry. Other times, it could be poetry. You may even find yourself writing a character analysis or a story arc. Whatever it is, write and write some more. Only for this, don't place any restrictions, just embrace whatever happens,

Change your location
Sometimes. all it takes is a change in location to find new inspiration. Go to a cafe, a park, even a different room in your own home. Try different lighting and even some essential oils. Try to channel locations that you think your characters may enjoy, too.

Get active (go for a brisk walk, do yoga, etc)
We're big advocates for yoga in general, but when it comes to writing, we can't say enough how it's helped us. If yoga isn't your thing, getting active in any way is going to help - we promise. Your body and your mind work better together when they're both being exercised.

Write at a different time of day
We have a habit of falling into a rut when it comes to writing, especially when we find ourselves feeling extremely busy. We usually just try to write at night, but we also realized that we were losing inspiration when we sat down at 11:30 every night to try to come up with something. These days, we switch it up. Try writing in the morning for a few days, take an afternoon session for the next few, and then try to find some time at night. Switching it up can make a huge difference.

Read (short stories, inspirational quotes, poems, anything to remind you that creativity can be found anywhere)
It might seem counterproductive to read something else when you're trying to write your own story, but inspiration can come from unexpected places. We look up lyrics to our favorite empowering songs, Disney quotes (seriously...they can really get you feeling like you can accomplish anything), poems, and short stories. You may be surprised to find out how much motivation you can really find.

What are some tips and tricks you use to get past writer's block? We'd love to hear them.
 
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JMilz

Active member
I have been a professional ghostwriter, copywriter, article writer, editor, and content writer for five years. Writing for 12+ hours a day (especially on a professional level for topics you may not be passionate about) can be pretty difficult, but I've found a few things that help me power through the toughest parts of the process.

First and foremost, don't get discouraged. Always keep writing.

It may sound silly, and sometimes it really is not that easy! Remember, you can edit later. Even if you hate your first draft, it may take you through the steps you need to take to create an incredible second, third, or fourth draft. It doesn't need to be perfect the first time! Each sentence does not need to be Shapespearean. You just need to get something onto the page that makes you say "hey, maybe this isn't quite right, but how about I try this" when you come back to it later.

Write a short story.

Maybe your longer story is stuck somewhere and you just cannot develop the plot in the way that you'd like to. Find a topic and write something short and sweet! It might help you get back into the swing of things just enough to bite into your novel/longer story again.

Plan your plot points.

Make an outline before you start. I used to write freeform, but I found that I would end up stuck somewhere. Develop the skeleton of the story before you start and you will find it can least help you put together the first draft. The more detailed, the better! I usually break mine down chapter-by-chapter with 1-3 paragraphs of descriptive plot points. Paragraph outlines do not work for everyone, but I've found it's been very helpful for my personal process. Some prefer numbered outlines or bullet points. Try it a few different ways and see what works for you!
 
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Ashley Marie

Headmaster
Staff member
I have been a professional ghostwriter, copywriter, article writer, editor, and content writer for five years. Writing for 12+ hours a day (especially on a professional level for topics you may not be passionate about) can be pretty difficult, but I've found a few things that help me power through the toughest parts of the process.

First and foremost, don't get discouraged. Always keep writing.

It may sound silly, and sometimes it really is not that easy! Remember, you can edit later. Even if you hate your first draft, it may take you through the steps you need to take to create an incredible second, third, or fourth draft. It doesn't need to be perfect the first time! Each sentence does not need to be Shapespearean. You just need to get something onto the page that makes you say "hey, maybe this isn't quite right, but how about I try this" when you come back to it later.

Write a short story.

Maybe your longer story is stuck somewhere and you just cannot develop the plot in the way that you'd like to. Find a topic and write something short and sweet! It might help you get back into the swing of things just enough to bite into your novel/longer story again.

Plan your plot points.

Make an outline before you start. I used to write freeform, but I found that I would end up stuck somewhere. Develop the skeleton of the story before you start and you will find it can least help you put together the first draft. The more detailed, the better! I usually break mine down chapter-by-chapter with 1-3 paragraphs of descriptive plot points. Paragraph outlines do not work for everyone, but I've found it's been very helpful for my personal process. Some prefer numbered outlines or bullet points. Try it a few different ways and see what works for you!
These tips are awesome! Thank you!
 
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